Hurricane Preparedness

Dated: July 12 2020

Views: 880

2020 - This year, Florida is still struggling wit the worldwide Pandemic as we enter Hurricane Season.  Here is some information on preparing for hurricane season.

 ▪ Obtain a Local Hurricane Guide: Most municipalities in Florida produce hurricane preparedness guides that include evacuation plans, shelter locations, important contact numbers, survival kit recommendations, and more. 

▪ Update Your Contact Information: Unit owners and residents should make sure that the association has their accurate phone number, address and email address.

▪ Disabled Resident Assistance: Any residents that would need assistance in the event of an evacuation should inform the association and reach out to their city and/ or county to sign up for emergency aid.

▪ Consider Homeowner’s Insurance: All owners should consider homeowners insurance.

▪ Photograph Your Home and Valuables: It is worthwhile for every unit owner or resident to photograph to capture on film all the personal property within their home.  After a storm, this can be a helpful way to identify items that are missing. For owners with homeowner’s insurance, photographing the property (and valuable items such as TVs) may make processing claims with their insurance companies much easier. It is prudent to contact your insurance company and ask them what they would ideally like to see in the event of a major claim post hurricane. They can typically provide guidance on how to properly prepare.

▪ Create a Survival Kit: Keep a survival kit in your home that you can grab in the event of an evacuation. A survival kit should include, at a minimum, fresh water supply, batteries, canned goods, proper identification, important documentation (e.g., birth certificates, social security cards, insurance policies), proof of ownership of your home (possibly necessary to get back onto the community property after a severe storm where major damage was sustained), cash, and medications.

 ▪ Learn about FEMA: Unit owners should familiarize themselves with FEMA’s Individuals and Households Program, which aids people whose property has been damaged or destroyed. Identify who to call and how to apply for aid in the event your home is unlivable after a storm. ▪ Clear Patios & Balconies: Residents should bring any personal property on patios or balconies inside their units.

▪ Designate a Safe Room: Designate a room in your unit that provides the most shelter from the storm. Typically, this is an interior room with no windows.

▪ Stay Tuned: Keep the radio or TV tuned to emergency frequencies, the local news, or the weather channel for regular updates.

▪ Establish an Evacuation Plan: Residents should know their city’s evacuation zone, where they will go once an evacuation is required and the location of the nearest shelters (including if the shelter accepts pets – see www.floridapets.net).

 ▪ Charge Your Electronics: All residents should charge cell phone, camera and laptop batteries and consider purchasing backup batteries.

▪ Prepare Your Vehicle: Residents should fill up their cars with gas and check tire pressure. The sooner this is done the better, as lines at gas stations tend to get longer as the storm approaches.

▪ Fill Your Bathtub: Consider storing drinking water in large containers or in the bathtub, as tap water may not be safe to drink for some time after the storm.

▪ Set Freezer & Fridge to Coldest Settings: Residents should set their freezer and refrigerator to the coolest setting to protect food for as long as possible if electricity is lost. It is prudent to have several days’ worth of food on hand that does not require refrigeration.

 ▪ Protect Personal Property: Residents should consider moving valuable items away from windows and doors. A supply of towels should be kept on hand to address any water entry during the storm

 

PLEASE FURTHER EDUCATE YOURSELVES BY VISITING THE FOLLOWING LINKS FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

• For up to date storm tracking please visit the National Hurricane Center website at www.nch.noaa.gov

• For further preparedness information please visit the Red Cross website at http://www.redcross.org/prepare/disaster/hurricane.

Understanding the difference between National Weather Service watches and warnings is critical to being prepared for any dangerous weather hazard, including hurricanes.

A watch lets you know that weather conditions are favorable for a hazard to occur. It literally means "be on guard!" During a weather watch, gather awareness of the specific threat and prepare for action - monitor the weather to find out if severe weather conditions have deteriorated and discuss your protective action plans with your family.

A warning requires immediate action. This means a weather hazard is imminent - it is either occurring (a tornado has been spotted, for example) - or it is about to occur at any moment. During a weather warning, it is important to act: grab the emergency kit you have prepared in advance and head to safety immediately. Both watches and warnings are important, but warnings are more urgent.

Hurricane / Tropical Storm Alerts

Tropical Storm Watch: An announcement that tropical-storm conditions are possible within the specified area.  ▪ Hurricane Watch: An announcement that hurricane conditions are possible within the specified area.

Because outside preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, watches are issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm - force winds.

Action: During a watch, prepare your home and review your plan for evacuation in case a Hurricane or Tropical Storm Warning is issued. Listen closely to instructions from local officials.

Tropical Storm Warning: An announcement that tropical-storm conditions are expected within the specified area. 

Hurricane Warning: An announcement that hurricane conditions are expected within the specified area.

Because outside preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, warnings are issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical storm - force winds.

Action: During a warning, complete storm preparations and immediately leave the threatened area if directed by local officials.

Extreme Wind Warning - Extreme sustained winds of a major hurricane (115 mph or greater), usually associated with the eyewall, are expected to begin within an hour. 

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Phyllis Koch & Charlie Katz

Phyllis & Charlie Will Dream With You -- To Make Your Dreams Come True....

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